family life

la cucina: the kitchen

At our six hour cooking class with Spanocchia’s born and bred Loredana, we were taught many things today. Toured around their vast hillside garden, I saw their stone-creeping capers, walnut tree, limonatta trees for limoncello, free-run chickens, twenty seven cats, three dogs, and a cabbage patch. Loredana, with her English translating (also homeschooled for twelve … Continue reading

family life

what, the mediterranean?

Okay, so I had nothing to be afraid of. Roma traffic is looney. Otherwise, Italy is fairly tame. Still, when I asked our driver what the worst thing about living in Rome was, he said, ta da: traffic, and parking. Surprise, surprise. But his family likes to have a vehicle because walking is no fun. … Continue reading

family life

michelangelo, mosquitoes, and motorcycles

Wooh, I am wiped. It might be the hypoglycemic effect of eating too much bread, or pizza, or gelato. It might be overexposure to Italian renaissance art, but I doubt it–I could spend a weekend in the Vatican.   I think it’s all that walking, and walking, and walking, and walking. I need my chiropractor, … Continue reading

family life

stuff the tour guide hasn’t taught me

1. Even a family of six can backpack Europe. The less you bring, the happier you are. But it will take you longer to decide what to put in the backpack. 2. It can take days to sleep through the night when adjusting to a new time zone. Last night was the night. Yayyyyyy! 3. … Continue reading

family life

take me out to the ballgame

Volare, the tried and true first vehicle I owned, happens to be the first restaurant name we’ve attached to our two day Chicago layover. Deep dish pizza be darned. On the night before we fly to Rome, we’re ordering tortellini stuffed with lobster, veal limone, linguine alfredo, and four cheese pizza–gorgonzola, manchego, asiago and mozzarella. … Continue reading

family life

travelling as a unit study

I’ve heard it said a LOT: it’s so good, then, that you homeschool, so you can travel with ease. Yes, it’s true. It does making approaching an education simpler when there are no teachers to consult, no workbooks to tote along, no schedule is interrupted. But this is not at all why we homeschool. For … Continue reading