13 Things Mentally Strong Don’t Do: Amy Morin influences my homeschool

Homeschool mamas definitely need to be mentally strong, don’t ya think?

This compelling title found me in an airport bookshop once upon a time (when we all liberally wandered into airports) and Amy Morin’s book title spoke to me.

Where else does one leisurely peruse books than when biding time waiting for boarding?

This title caught my attention: 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do by Amy Morin.



Thirteen Things Mentally Strong Homescghool Moms Don't Do

Take back your power, embrace change, face your fears, and train your brain for happiness and success.

Amy Morin

Based on the list of thirteen things on the back cover, I feel I could have written this book. They are things I’ve learned and am still learning, in my life. And I’ve definitely learned a lot of them as I’ve homeschooled my four kiddos.

Amy Morin says mentally strong people don’t do the following…

1. They don’t waste time feeling sorry for themselves.

That would be easy to do this year. We have to determine how we’re filling our days as homeschool parents and we get to do it.

March forward, despite all the challenges.

2. They don’t give away their power.

When we react to stuff or people going on around us, we aren’t choosing. We’re giving away our power. We need to be proactive, not reactive.

3.  They don’t shy away from change.

Like we have a choice in the last couple of years. But we could still try to resist.

Change is a guarantee in this life. Consider it life’s way of preventing boredom…

4.  They don’t focus on things they can’t control.

Because if we haven’t learned that we aren’t in control of everything about our lives, we probably have finally learned it this year.

5.  They don’t worry about pleasing everyone.

When we let go of listening to other people’s expectations of us and our kids’ education, we can do our homeschool our way: the way that fits us and our specific children.

6.  They don’t fear taking calculated risks.

Whether you realize it or not, if you took up homeschooling, you already took up a calculated risk.

So own it. And enjoy it.

7.  They don’t dwell on the past.

The way things used to be, like TWO YEARS AGO. It is what it is.

Today is a different day, a different year than last year.

How will you show up THIS day?

8. They don’t make the same mistakes over and over.

Except you will, of course.

But mistakes are there to teach you something, so you don’t have to continually hit your head against a wall.

So listen to what the wall is telling you.

9.  They don’t resent other people’s success.

Keep in your lane. Do your own thing.

You have your specific children, you have your specific experience of education that naturally compels you to approach homeschooling in your unique way, so enjoy your family, enjoy your Instagram feed, your unique way of homeschooling, your story, and celebrate when others are doing good things in theirs.

10.  They don’t give up after their first failure.

If you really want to continue homeschooling, expect you’ll fail. Yes, you really will. You’ll know it in your soul that you didn’t quite hit the mark, you didn’t quite show up the way you wanted to, and you’ll look back and know it didn’t all unfold as you had expected or hoped. But your failures didn’t prevent you from pursuing the thing you really wanted: to capture all the charms of your homeschool freedoms. So keep on keeping on!

11. They don’t fear alone time.

Solitude is good for all of us. This year, we get to explore that a little more.

Or, the alternative approach to this eleventh statement: WHAT alone time? I’m a homeschool mom.

12. They don’t feel the world owes them anything.

This one speaks for itself.

Does the world owe you validation in your homeschool choice?

Nope.

You decided it was the best choice for your family, so own it, relish it, and don’t look for affirmation from others about your choice.

13.  They don’t expect immediate results.

Cause this homeschool thing is a long game, a marathon of parenting.

One day, you get to look back and see the big picture.

But not yet.

Keep going, girlfriend! You got this!



Amy Morin’s book makes me think…

Everyone has a story of why me, especially this year. Anyone can turn that why me story into a story demanding special attention or a story that declares impotence.

Life can be challenging, but we get to decide how we frame those challenges.

Past schmast. Everyone has a past. Everyone has a story.

A story that might make others’ jaws drop or bring someone to compassionate tears, we all have them but would terrify the storyteller to share in a crowd.

We can’t change our stories, so we have to get on with living forward and live our lives on purpose for this time that we have.


How we think affects how we approach our life, our purpose, our relationships, and our homeschools.

Teresa Wiedrick, author of Homeschool Mama Self-Care: Nurturing the Nurturer



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